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Survey reveals what young workers think

More than 80 percent of young employees in companies with foreign investment in Shanghai are confident about the future development of the city, a survey organized by the Shanghai Committee of the Chinese Communist Youth League has found.

The report also showed that nearly 96 percent of young employees are optimistic about their career development, despite the high cost of living and fierce competition.

There were more than 90,000 companies with foreign investment in Shanghai by the end of March, contributing 27 percent to the city's GDP and employing more than 20 percent of the city's workforce.

More than 40 percent of their employees are younger than 40.

Over 45 percent of the polled young employees said they felt the pressure from life or work in Shanghai was "challenging," and 35 percent felt the pressure was "too much."

But 95.89 percent still believed Shanghai was better for career development.

About 70 percent of the surveyed people earn 10,000 to 30,000 yuan (US$4,335) per month after tax.

About 63 percent said they put most of their income into investments and savings, followed by spending on their children's education, travel, dining and entertainment.

More than 14 percent said they were dissatisfied with the quality of air and water in Shanghai, and about 60 percent said they needed to be improved.

But nearly 60 percent believed that air quality in Shanghai has improved in the last two years and nearly 73.8 percent believed the environment will be better in Shanghai.

More than 45 percent said it was easy to make new friends outside of work in Shanghai, while more than 25 percent found it was not easy and over 28 percent felt it was hard to say.

When asked how they spent the weekend, 68.84 percent nominated dining and conversation with friends, followed by activities with children, shopping, watching movies and singing.

About 63 percent said they needed to build up more professional knowledge and skills, to better support the city's development and realize personal achievements, followed by building wider networks, improving language skills, and having more overseas work experience.

The respondents also said they care most about public services and policies related to housing (70.72 percent), their children's education (69.52 percent) and medical care (53.94 percent) followed by citizenship (41.10 percent).

 

 

More than 80 percent of young employees in companies with foreign investment in Shanghai are confident about the future development of the city, a survey organized by the Shanghai Committee of the Chinese Communist Youth League has found. The report also showed that nearly 96 percent of young employees are optimistic about their career development, despite the high cost of living and fierce competition. There were more than 90,000 companies with foreign investment in Shanghai by the end of March, contributing 27 percent to the city's GDP and employing more than 20 percent of the city's workforce. More than 40 percent of their employees are younger than 40. Over 45 percent of the polled young employees said they felt the pressure from life or work in Shanghai was "challenging," and 35 percent felt the pressure was "too much." But 95.89 percent still believed Shanghai was better for career development. About 70 percent of the surveyed people earn 10,000 to 30,000 yuan (US$4,335) per month after tax. About 63 percent said they put most of their income into investments and savings, followed by spending on their children's education, travel, dining and entertainment. More than 14 percent said they were dissatisfied with the quality of air and water in Shanghai, and about 60 percent said they needed to be improved. But nearly 60 percent believed that air quality in Shanghai has improved in the last two years and nearly 73.8 percent believed the environment will be better in Shanghai. More than 45 percent said it was easy to make new friends outside of work in Shanghai, while more than 25 percent found it was not easy and over 28 percent felt it was hard to say. When asked how they spent the weekend, 68.84 percent nominated dining and conversation with friends, followed by activities with children, shopping, watching movies and singing. About 63 percent said they needed to build up more professional knowledge and skills, to better support the city's development and realize personal achievements, followed by building wider networks, improving language skills, and having more overseas work experience. The respondents also said they care most about public services and policies related to housing (70.72 percent), their children's education (69.52 percent) and medical care (53.94 percent) followed by citizenship (41.10 percent).

Copyright 2009 Shanghai Municipal Human Resources and Social Security Bureau. All rights reserved.